Spain’s Death Toll Jumps to Beyond 4,000 after 683 More Died

In total, Spain has registered 4,089 deaths from COVID-19, and 56,188 confirmed coronavirus cases, according to data released by the country’s Health Ministry on Thursday.

Since yesterday, the death toll jumped by 655 and the number of confirmed cases rose by 8,578.

Yesterday, Spain surpassed China in the total number of deaths. With 738 deaths on Wednesday, Spain also registered more deaths in one day than Italy.

While Thursday’s numbers show a slight drop in fatalities compared to Wednesday, experts do not expect the peak in deaths to occur for weeks.

In total, 7,015 patients with COVID-19 in Spain have recovered. Over 3,600 are currently in intensive care units.

Madrid has been the worst-hit area so far with over 2,000 deaths and 17,000 cases. The region has seen hospitals and funeral services overflowing. As a response, Spain’s capital city has rapidly erected a makeshift hospital — now the largest in Spain – in a convention center, and has begun to use a skating rink as a morgue.

The region of Catalonia has also been witnessing a worrying spike in deaths and cases. The region has registered 672 deaths, and over 11,500 confirmed cases.

In Spain, three members of the governing coalition have now tested positive for coronavirus, as has the country’s first lady. The Spanish army’s media contact on coronavirus was also confirmed to have COVID-19 on Wednesday.

Widespread shortages of equipment

have been registered nationwide. On Wednesday, the government announced it had made a €432 million ($473.7 million) deal with China to bring in more protective equipment, tests and ventilators. Earlier in the week, Spain also sent in an urgent request to NATO asking for more medical supplies.

After first appearing in Wuhan, China last December, the virus known as COVID-19 has spread to at least 175 countries and territories.

The number of confirmed cases worldwide has surpassed 480,400 while the death toll is over 21,500 and almost 115,800 have recovered, according to data compiled by the U.S.-based Johns Hopkins University.