New Travel Rules For Brits As UK Becomes Non-EU Country After Dec 31

Just a bit more than a month away, the United Kingdom will become a non-EU country, and its citizens will cease being EU nationals. Once January 1 comes, Britons will also stop enjoying several benefits that they have enjoyed so far due to their EU nationality, including travel facilities.

New Travel Rules For Brits As UK Becomes Non-EU Country After Dec 31
New Travel Rules For Brits As UK Becomes Non-EU Country After Dec 31

With non-EU passports, Brits will have to follow the rules of travel that all other third-country citizens follow, as passport rules, a limited number of the days of stay in EU, health insurance access and many more.

 All changes that Britons travelling to the EU starting from January 1 will go through, and what happens if they attempt to disrespect these rules.

The first and perhaps the most important thing that a UK national must know when travelling to the EU starting from next year is that his/her passport may not qualify for entry in the EU.

While the EU and UK have agreed to grant the citizens of each other with the possibility

of visa-free short-term visits, the EU has some passport rules that it applies to all third-countries, and the UK will be no exception.

Not only that Brits will be unable to travel with only an ID, but their passport must also meet the criteria listed below:

  • It must be valid for at least another six months on the day its holder travels to EU
  • It must not be older than ten years on the day its holder travels to EU

As per burgundy passports and those that have the words ‘European Union’ on the cover, they will remain valid until the day they expire; therefore, holders of such passports do not need to renew them if they meet the other two conditions listed above.

At the same time, passports with extra months added from the previous passports, will not have their extra months counted.

If you renewed your current passport before the previous one expired, extra month may have been added to its expiry date. Any extra months on your passport over 10 years may not count towards the 6 months needed,” the UK the government explains