Meaning of Writings Written On The Guns, Used in New Zealand Mosque Attack

Brenton Tarrant Shoot at two mosques in Christchurch on March 15 saw at least 49 people killed, and dozens more seriously injured, as he open fired on the worshippers on Friday prayer.

Meaning of Writings Written On The Guns, Used in New Zealand Mosque Attack

Meaning of Writings Written On The Guns, Used in New Zealand Mosque Attack

In all, 49, people were killed and more than 20 wounded in the March 15 attack on two mosques in the New Zealand city of Christchurch. An Australian man who claimed responsibility for the shootings said in a manifesto that he came to New Zealand only to plan and prepare for the attack.

Multilingual lettering scrawled on his guns, with references to various figures from history, past and more recent: Serbian, Italian, Hungarian, Ukrainian. And then there’s the Georgian king and Georgian consort from the 12th century.

What appears to link the names together, Georgian or otherwise, is the figures were all participants in major battles or military conflicts with Islamic armies from history: variously called Ottoman, Persian, Seljuk, or Turkish, depending on the era and the author.

Here’s the meaning behind some of the writings on the gun used by Brenton Tarrant who Shoot at two mosques in Christchurch on March 15 saw at least 49 people killed, and dozens more seriously injured, as he open fired on the worshippers on Friday prayer.

Anton Lundin Pettersson:
A student who killed two migrant children in Sweden.

Alexandre Bissonnette:
Attacked a mosque and killed 6 people in Canada in 2017.

Skanderberg:
The Albanian leader who was responsible of an uprising against the Ottoman Empire.

Antonio Bragadin:
the Venetian military officer who broke an agreement and killed Turkish captives.

Carles Martel:
The Frankish military leader who defeated Muslims in the Andalusia in the Battle of Tours.

1683:
Vienna was besieged a second time by the Ottoman Empire in 1683.

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